Photo: Sunshine Week Campaign Transparency

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ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016 AND THEREAFTER - FILE - In this June 6, 2012 file photo, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, second from left, and Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch are greeted by the governor's cabinet and staff at the state Capitol Madison, Wis., a day after Walker beat Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in a recall election. A railroad executive was caught violating contribution limits for illegally funneling cash to Walker's campaign through his employees. Key to the investigation, was a requirement that donors disclose where they work, but Republican lawmakers have since wiped out the rule. (AP Photo/Andy Manis, File)

ADVANCE FOR USE SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 2016 AND THEREAFTER – FILE – In this June 6, 2012 file photo, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, second from left, and Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch are greeted by the governor’s cabinet and staff at the state Capitol Madison, Wis., a day after Walker beat Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett in a recall election. A railroad executive was caught violating contribution limits for illegally funneling cash to Walker’s campaign through his employees. Key to the investigation, was a requirement that donors disclose where they work, but Republican lawmakers have since wiped out the rule. (AP Photo/Andy Manis, File)

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  1. […] SUNSHINE WEEK-CAMPAIGN TRANSPARENCY Politicians in Mississippi have used campaign funds to pay for such things as a BMW, an RV and $800 cowboy boots. In Wisconsin, a railroad executive was caught violating contribution limits after an ex-girlfriend he met on a “sugar daddy” dating website reported him for illegally funneling cash to Gov. Scott Walker’s campaign through his employees. Key to the investigation, election officials say, was a requirement that donors disclose where they work — but Republican lawmakers have since wiped out the rule. Meanwhile, “dark money” spending by outside groups that aren’t required to disclose their donors is expected to explode during this presidential election year. States can take action to stem the tide, but few have. Congress could require more disclosure about who is financing campaigns, but it has made no move to do so. Disclosure may be the public’s best and often only remaining way of knowing who is supporting political candidates in the wake of recent court decisions. By Mary Spicuzza (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel) and Jeremy White (The Sacramento Bee). Photo. […]

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